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Aggies can change the world. Geoscientists lead the way.

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Learn more about what it takes to become a student in Geosciences.

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Learn more about Differential Tuition in the College of Geosciences

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YOU CAN MAKE A GLOBAL IMPACT

Geoscientists are essential to solving society's grand challenges – global climate change, air and water quality, and adequate energy and food supplies. Are you up to the challenge?

Geoscientists are leaders in providing solutions to pressing societal problems, including securing a reliable and affordable energy future, optimizing the use of our natural resources, predicting natural hazards and identifying mitigating actions that will allow communities to prosper in times of adversity, expanding our knowledge of Earth and planetary systems for the benefit of future generations, and educating a geoscience workforce who will become future leaders.


LATEST NEWS


6,000 Years Ago The Sahara Desert Was Tropical, So What Happened?

6,000 Years Ago The Sahara Desert Was Tropical, So What Happened?

As little as 6,000 years ago, the vast Sahara Desert was covered in grassland that received plenty of rainfall, but shifts in the world’s weather patterns abruptly transformed the vegetated region into some of the driest land on Earth.  A Texas A&M university researcher is trying to uncover the clues responsible for this enormous climate transformation – and the findings could lead to better rainfall predictions worldwide.

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Texas A&M To Establish Premier Stable Isotope Capabilities

Texas A&M To Establish Premier Stable Isotope Capabilities

$1 million grant enables purchase of two highly technical instruments

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Texas A&M Team Examines Role Of Dispersants In 2010 Gulf Oil Spill

Texas A&M Team Examines Role Of Dispersants In 2010 Gulf Oil Spill

Following the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, dispersants were used to keep the oil from coming ashore by dispersing and diluting it. According to a new study led by a Texas A&M University at Galveston researcher, “marine oil snow formation” – a natural process whereby sticky materials excreted by plankton and bacteria can help to enhance dispersing effects by providing a microhabitat for oil degradation – was observed for the first time.

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Aggies can change the world. Geoscientists lead the way.